Category: Kings of the East

Nov 18

Red Flag Over the Atlantic

On June 27, a plane carrying Wen Jiabao made a “technical” stop on the island of Terceira, in the Azores. Following an official greeting by Alamo Meneses, the regional secretary of environment of the sea, the Chinese premier spent four hours touring the remote Portuguese outpost in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

Wen’s Terceira walkabout, which followed a four-nation visit to South America, largely escaped notice at the time, but alarm bells should have immediately gone off in Washington and in European capitals. For one thing, Wen’s last official stop on the trip was Santiago, the capital of Chile. Flights from Chile to China normally cross the Pacific, not the Atlantic, so there was no reason for his plane to be near the Azores. Moreover, those who visit the Azores generally favor other islands in the out-of-the-way chain.

Terceira, however, has one big attraction for Beijing: Air Base No. 4. Better known as Lajes Field, the facility where Premier Wen’s 747 landed in June is jointly operated by the U.S. Air Force and its Portuguese counterpart. If China controlled the base, the Atlantic would no longer be secure. From the 10,865-foot runway on the northeast edge of the island, Chinese planes could patrol the northern and central portions of the Atlantic and thereby cut air and sea traffic between the U.S. and Europe. Beijing would also be able to deny access to the nearby Mediterranean Sea.

And China could target the American homeland. Lajes is less than 2,300 miles from New York, shorter than the distance between Pearl Harbor and Los Angeles.

Lajes is certainly the reason Wen went out of his way to win friends in Terceira. For years his country has been trying to make inroads into the Azores and waiting for opportunities to pounce. There is nothing the Chinese can do if the U.S. stays, but Pentagon budget cutters, according to some observers, are planning to make Lajes a “ghost base.”

At one time, the facility was critically important. During World War II, the airfield was instrumental in hunting U-boats, and in the Cold War the base helped the West track the Soviets. Lajes was a busy transit point in the Gulf War. It was one of the spots where the Space Shuttle could have landed in an emergency.

Now Lajes is home to the USAF’s 65th Air Base Wing, which supports American and NATO aircraft transiting the Atlantic, and it hosts various other American military units. Its role, nonetheless, is greatly diminished. Peace in the North Atlantic and advances in air-to-air refueling have decreased the importance of the strategic runway, which is now rarely used by the U.S.

So from a purely military point of view, the decision to cease operations at Lajes makes sense. The effective closure of the field, however, would send Terceira into a tailspin. While agriculture forms the basis of the island’s economy, the base directly accounts for about one in 20 jobs there. Unemployment is already high, about 10 percent. If Terceira is to have any future, the Portuguese government will have to find a new major tenant for Air Base No. 4.

In recent years, Beijing has identified Portugal as its entry point into Europe, and Chinese officials now know their way to Lisbon. It is in this context that the Portuguese are already thinking about the planned closure of Lajes Field. They don’t want to invite the Chinese in, but they have quietly indicated they will have no choice if the U.S. Air Force decides to leave the base.

“We have a close relationship with Portugal,” the Defense Department told NRO when asked about the planned closure of Lajes and Beijing’s apparent interest in taking it over. “They are an important NATO ally and bilateral partner, and we continue to discuss our strong defense cooperation, in Portugal and around the world.”

We will, as a longtime ally, need to work closely with Lisbon over an especially thorny issue, but in the interim, there are things that can be done. For instance, it’s not entirely clear why the U.S. Africa Command should be based at Kelley Barracks, outside Stuttgart. A transfer of the approximately 1,500 staff there to Lajes, which is much closer to Africa, would solve the problem overnight, and the move might actually improve Africom’s effectiveness.

There are undoubtedly other stopgap solutions that the Pentagon could implement. None of them will be perfect, but all of them would be better than having Beijing’s red flag flying over the Atlantic — and permitting Chinese aircraft to patrol the waters connecting America to Europe.

Permanent link to this article: http://discerningthetimes.me/?p=4424

Sep 21

Kings of the East: Are they ready to March?

The Bible talks about the role the Kings of the East will play in the events of the last days. These kings are mentioned in the book of Revelation in chapter 16 in verse 12 as the sixth bowl is poured out on the earth in judgment from the Lord. The Euphrates River is dried up and the way is laid open for these kings to come into the battle in the Middle East. So we do know that these kings are eastern nations. The largest most powerful nations east of Iraq are China and India.

There has been a rapid emergence in the power that these Asian nations play on the world scene in recent years. These two countries are following on the heels of Japan and South Korea and are becoming Asian economic dynamos. They are large countries with extremely large populations and they are now fully awake.

This rapid rising has occurred in the space of the last 40 years. They are impacting the world on a large scale from a military, economic and a financial perspective.

When the last days time clock begin again with the forming of the nation of Israel in 1948 after almost 2,000 years, this rise of these Asian behemoths took place after this in conjunction with all the other events that have unfolded.

The key questions that we need to be asking are: are India and China the kings of the east from Scripture? And number two is will it be benefical to the world?

The rise of Asia has all the earmarks of an endtime financial phenomenon in addition to all the Scriptural alignments. All of the five telltale characteristics of a last day phenomena can be seen:

1. An accelaration of observed after 1948

2. A seeming improbability and inexplicably of its occurrence

3. Godlessness (Buddism and Hinduism)

4. A scope of worldwide impact

5. Suddenness and rapidity

The economic impact of these two countries is scary: they are dominating the global market.  They are sitting at the global policymaking tables of the G-20 and other transnational organizations.

These two countries comprise roughly 40% of the world’s land mass and approximately 60% of the earth’s population.

Napoleon predicted over 200 years ago after returning from a trip to China “when China awakes, it will shake the world”. Well the world is shaking at this power!

China can today field an army of 200 million men just by itself, when you add India to the mix can you say scary?

The kings of the east are on the rise and will be prepared to march soon. I will provide periodic updates as we look at this phenomenon.

Keep looking up!

             

Permanent link to this article: http://discerningthetimes.me/?p=2511